Divorce Decrees now REQUIRED in GA if you’ve been divorced and want to get married.

Yup, that’s right!

Now Georgia requires you to bring divorce decrees. Not just from six months ago, but from forever ago.

This is important, but who knows why?! You can marry your first cousin in GA but you can’t marry your same gendered partner. HOWEVER you have to bring up your past that you’re trying to forget! If you’ve EVER been married you HAVE to bring the divorce decrees.

Call the probate court and complain… or ask why: (912) 652-7395

Make sure photographers, videographers, and officiants are on the same page with Bride!

I don’t think that this is a Catholic Priest, as they are suppose only have weddings in the church.  Not sure who this was or who’s wedding, but it certainly brings to light the fact that the bride and groom, along with the photographers, videographers and officiant need to be on the same page.  I’ve had lots of comments on my Facebook page!

 

OMG Priest Stops A Wedding To Yell At Photographer.

 

Share your thoughts.

 

Cheryl and George….

Thank you for these words on WeddingWire.com

#justmarried @savannahido @visitsavannah @savannahwedpros #savannah #wedding #SavannahWedding #RevSchulte #AWeddingForTwo #ElopeInSavannah #AWeddingWithRevSchulte

#justmarried @savannahido @visitsavannah @savannahwedpros #savannah #wedding
#SavannahWedding #RevSchulte #AWeddingForTwo #ElopeInSavannah #AWeddingWithRevSchulte

This review for Rev. Schulte is long overdue, but even today, several months after our wedding, a guest commented on how fantastic our officiant was. He really exceeded our expectations and went way above and beyond the call of duty for us.

We booked Rev. Schulte via email about a year in advance as we were planning a destination wedding. From the outset, he was responsive to both email and phone. His website and blog were incredibly helpful, and he always had advice about practical wedding details, including which Savannah squares were best for our outdoor ceremony and what other vendors he recommended. He also has several sample ceremonies, and was very open to any sort of customization that we wanted.

We didn’t actually meet in person until two days before our wedding. We’d had quite a stressful week in Savannah (it included a trip to the ER for one of our family members), and I think Rev. Schulte could immediately tell that we were stressed. He was incredibly calming, and went over every detail of the ceremony with us over coffee. He really knows EVERYTHING – including the best places to stand in the square based on uneven pathway bricks, and which angles are better for photographers!! He then made the very generous offer of finding us a day of planner at a reasonable price- which he did almost immediately!!! He gave us the reminder that we needed at that moment, which was that our wedding was important and we were entitled to a special, perfect day! And it was, largely because of him.

The day of, my father was so overwhelmed that he blanked at the altar when it came time to give me away, and Rev. Schulte, with barely even a blink, very calmly walked him through it. We also loved loved loved his seersucker suit, which was perfect for our outdoor ceremony! We feel very lucky to have had him officiate for us – he really worked hard to give us a perfect day. We can’t thank him enough, and hope he takes us up on our offer to visit us in NYC!

 

Who has the right….

…to judge others?  Certainly not me.

The phone call recently about a couple who was being judged by their officiant because it was a second marriage (read into it, “you were divorced”) got me thinking about the right to judge others.

The couple that called asked me to officiate their ceremony.  I said I’d be honored.

I often get judged and I really try not to judge others – I don’t have the right to!

I have been judged on: where I live, that I was/is a yankee, what I drive, yep – my hair is thinning, that I like to go to sleep early,  and so on.  When I was a child I would be judged/made fun of because I  played the clarinet and tuba (not at the same time!)

Recently someone asked me when I got out of my car at a Christian event – with a very judgmental tone (the kind that you’d give a child when you say, “did you spill the milk?”),

“What do you do for a living?  What kind of car do you drive?”

Never in my life have I felt so judged because I drive my nearly seven year old midlife crisis convertible.

If I were to arrive anywhere in a car like this, I would be judged because I drive a car like this.

1978 Ford Pinto

 

The fact is, I used to own a car just like this! And, it was the first car I owned in my name (well, me and and finance company.) It was purchased used in 1983ish.

So now the world officially knows, I drive a white convertible!

Who has the right to judge others?

Share your thoughts.

Is hiring a friend as an officiant a good idea?

Let me say for starters, that the word is officiant (noun). If the person that you’re thinking about hiring doesn’t spell the word correctly, you’ll want to continue to look.

It’s a great idea to have a friend or family member officiate (verb) at a wedding. I was the officiant at my younger brother’s wedding. That was 7 years ago, and I’d been officiating weddings for 10 years at that time.

If you ask a friend or family member to officiate your ceremony, here are the things to consider:

First, even if they are used to speaking in front of others, how will they handle the unexpected? A crying baby, an outdoor ceremony with a loud motorcycle? Or take for instance, will they know to look at the couple during the exchange of vows to see if their face/eyes start to show emotions/tears? Will they know how to handle that: will they pause or just plow right through?

And, this is a tougher one: when people became emotional they will laugh or cry. Often times people laugh during the vows rather than cry, and it can be very disconcerting. Imagine the groom repeating after the officiant, “I promise to be faithful to you,” and then the groom starts to laugh, or the bride starts to laugh. How will the officiant handle that?

I’ve also seen officiants get so nervous they NEVER look at the couple: they only read from the papers in their folder.

Will the officiant tell the bride when to hand off the flowers? Or what if they forget to tell the guests to sit down? I’ve seen a couple weddings where guests stood the entire time because the officiant either forgot to stay anything or didn’t realize they were standing because they never looked up.

It is a very high honor to preside at a wedding – I never take it lightly.

Why hire an experienced professional wedding vendor? What do you do for living? Imagine you’re leaving for a one day vacation and a temp is brought in. How well will they do? Will you be comfortable leaving your job to this person, knowing when you come back things will probably be a mess?

The same goes for having an inexperienced person participating in one of the most important days of your life. I’m not saying you shouldn’t ask a family or friend to take part of your special day. I’m asking you to take a look at it from their point of view.

Once I saw an officiant do his first wedding. Going into it he was so calm and comfortable. But as soon as it started he got so nervous (and it was so obvious on his face) that he skipped over 1/2 of the ceremony, including the rings! Afterwards, during the reception, he told me it was MUCH more difficult than he ever thought. In fact he said he’d never do it again!

Also, you may not want to ask a parent to be the officiant. If my son asked me to officiate, I would say no. My reasoning is this, I can’t be the officiant and father of the groom at the same time. i can’t do the duel role and be in the moment. It’s not possible to be the father of the groom, enjoying that proud moment, while being the officiant.

Speaking of family members having a role, albeit officiant, photographer, coordinator, florist, if I were to be asked to officiate a relatives wedding (sibling, niece, or nephew) I would say no. And if the day comes that I would be asked by a grandchild to officiate their wedding, I would say no. I want to have a single role and focus.

Oh, BTW, I didn’t answer the headline question did I?

If you want family or friend(s) to participate in your wedding day, have them do a reading, or give them a special role that you say that it is so important that they do it: brining marriage license; bringing rings; being your personal assistant (taking care of bringing dress, makeup, hair products, etc.) There are so many things which need to be done, that I’m sure you can make them feel special by giving them a special small part/role for your wedding and/or rehearsal.

Share your thoughts!